Displaying items by tag: CFP

Femspec, an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to challenging gender through speculative means in any genre, invites papers for a special issue of Femspec, Aging and Gender in Speculative Fiction, examining speculative fiction books, TV shows, or movies that re-imagine the way we view women growing older and/or depict the way societal expectations of gender roles impact how we age. Keeping in mind the feminist thrust of the journal, we seek submissions that consider how major feminist sf writers depict aging characters, that apply feminist theory to depictions of aging in sf texts broadly defined, or that address sf’s potential to critique the relationship of gender to ideologies of aging in contemporary society or to re-imagine the future of aging primarily for women, but also for men within a gendered perspective.

The seeds for this special issue were planted at a paper session, "Women Growing Older in the Perilous Realm: Science Fiction and Re-Imagining Old Age" at the 2012 National Women's Studies Conference 2012, chaired by Margaret Cruickshank. Whether analyzing a picture of older women as inhabiting a privileged position from which to critique society as in “The Space Crone,” a vision of the planet Vulcan where an older woman is the powerful high priestess, or the creation of a culture in which older women are given the most creative work as in Joanna Russ’s Whileaway, we need to ask: how does this re-imagining of old age empower older women, give new value to their accumulated knowledge or new expression to their abilities, apply a feminist lens to their subordination or oppression, or otherwise upend the hegemonic narrative of women's aging as nothing but a decline into silence and invisibility.

Because Femspec is a fully independent journal funded by subscriptions rather than institutional support, subscription is required on submission. Essays undergo a rigorous two-step jury process with independent readers and members of the Femspec editorial board. Submissions can be sent directly to the special issue editor, Aishwarya Ganapathiraju, aganapath[at]gmail[dot]com or to Femspec.org, where subscription information can be found.

In addition to this special issue, Femspec seeks scholarly submissions that explore gender issues in sf, apply feminist criticism to the study of sf or analyze the work of women writers in science-fiction media or “speculative fiction” broadly defined.

The last date for submitting work for consideration is May 30, 2013.

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog

Pippi to Ripley: The Female Figure in Fantasy and Science Fiction

May 4-5, 2013, Ithaca College

Keynote speaker: Tamora Pierce

We welcome paper proposals on all aspects of female representation within an imaginative context, including but not limited to:

- A discussion of the child-heroines in folktales from multiple cultures.

- The evolution of characters such as Buffy (The Vampire Slayer), Cat Woman, and Red Sonja as they are presented in television, film, graphic novels/comics, or literature.

- The female characters in video games such as Tomb Raider, Metroid, and Mass Effect.

- The female characters featured in Shonen and Shojo manga as well as other images of female characters in anime films and television.

- Robot , cyborg, and psychically enhanced girls and women.

- Female heroes and villains in comic books and graphic novels.

- YA heroines in the works of Madeleine L'Engle, Tamora Pierce, and Suzanne Collins.

- The depiction of goddesses, Amazons, and other fierce female entities from western and non-western traditions.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract by February 1, 2013, to Katharine Kittredge, Ithaca College, Department of English, kkittredge[at]ithaca[dot]edu

Pippi to Ripley is intended to foster intellectual engagement between the college community and local students, teachers, writers, readers and artists; and to provide an affordable venue for undergraduates, graduate students and professors to present their work. Towards these ends, the

presenter’s registration fee is $35; all other participants are invited to attend for free. Direct questions to Katharine Kittredge, kkittredge[at]ithaca[dot]edu.

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog

Hey! An interesting and worthwhile academic SF conference being organized by my PhD thesis supervisor (who is wonderful) at McMaster University. I will definitely be sending in a proposal! Here are the details:

“Science Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Genre”

Featuring Robert J. Sawyer
McMaster University
September 13-15, 2013

On the occasion of Robert J. Sawyer’s donation of his archive to Mills Memorial Library, the Faculty of Humanities at McMaster University is hosting an international conference entitled “Science Fiction: The Interdisciplinary Genre,” a meeting of academics, writers, professionals, amateurs and fans, focusing on Canadian Science Fiction in general and Sawyer’s work in particular.

While the core of the event will be academic papers, we will also feature authors, editors, booksellers, librarians, commentators, and, of course, readers. Special guests are Robert J. Sawyer (author), John Robert Colombo (specialist of Canadian literature), Julie E. Czerneda (author), David G. Hartwell (editor, Tor), Élisabeth Vonarburg (author), Robert Charles Wilson (author), and Chris Szego of Bakka Phoenix Books.

The multimodal or interdisciplinary approach to the creation, reception and study of the SF genre has been a salient characteristic from Hugo Gernsback’s initial conceiving of the term “scientifiction” in 1926. Later, literary theorists such as Darko Suvin insisted on the particular knowledge, competency and frame of mind required in order to decipher the genre’s figurative meaning: SF, according to Suvin,

is an educational literature, […] irreversibly shaped by the pathos of preaching the good word of human curiosity, fear, and hope. […] It demands from the author and reader, teacher and critic, not merely specialized, quantified positivistic knowledge (scientia) but a social imagination whose quality of wisdom (sapienta) testifies to the maturity of his critical and creative thought.[1]

Indeed, Sawyer’s work has garnered the attention of both the literary and scientific communities for its technical accuracy presented through speculative imagination, appealing to both the rational imperative and the sense of wonder inherent in the union of science and fiction. While Sawyer’s stated mandate is foremost to “intrigue,” and not strictly to “educate,” he insists that “[r]esearch is the heart and soul of modern SF writing; scientists are handing us gigantic ideas and mind-boggling stuff” on which to base stories. Through rigorous research initiatives, Sawyer has cultivated and contributed valuably to knowledge in various fields and his expertise is highly sought-after in both popular culture and official circles: for example, he explains that when he was writing “Frameshift, I thought I didn’t know enough genetics, so I dived in to learn all about it… and ended up on Rivera Live on CNBC talking about the Human Genome Project and advising Canada’s Federal Department of Justice about it.” Sawyer’s work and that of other thinkers and writers, past, present and future, have the power, “with words, [to] reach across time, even after death, to influence people.” Human knowledge thus becomes increasingly accessible thanks to the various media through which it is approached and transmitted. Diverse perspectives on knowledge serve to shed new light on traditional thinking and sf clearly represents radically different perspectives:

Multidisciplinary studies are the future: one of the reasons I write so much about the burgeoning science of consciousness […] is that it is so multidisciplinary: neuroscientists, cognitive scientists, AI researchers, anesthesiologists, quantum physicists, philosophers, and even some of us lowly science-fiction writers have made important contributions.[2]

It is in the spirit of an interdisciplinarity approach to science, fiction and science fiction that we invite thinkers of varying descriptions to propose talks aimed at enriching the discussion. While the conference is focused on Canadian SF and especially the literary work of Robert J. Sawyer, papers may address the broader issues at stake, notably the scientific and ethical ramifications at the core of the fictional intrigues: machines matching human capabilities (or the singularity), synthetic biology, etc. We would also welcome panel proposals should you feel inclined to organize your talk and those of willing collaborators under a single topic.

The principle language of the event will be English, though we would like to explore the possibility of running certain panels in French, according to the needs of presenters and interest of other participants. Please indicate if you are a native speaker of French or sufficiently fluent and whether or not you would prefer to give your talk in French or if you are in a position to attend talks and panel discussions in French.

Please send proposals (of 300 words max.) by March 31st, 2013 to both C. Annette Grisé <grisec[at]mcmaster[dot]ca> and Nicholas Serruys <serruys[at]mcmaster[dot]ca>.

We will also endeavor to publish a volume of selected articles, ideally within the year following the event.


[1] Darko Suvin, Metamorphoses of Science Fiction (New Haven: Yale UP, 1979): 40.

[2] Sawyer quotes taken from an interview conducted by Roger Deforest and posted April 3rd, 2007 on the website Hard SF: “Robert J. Sawyer Confronts Our Damn Life Clocks in Rollback.” <http://www.hardsciencefiction.rogerdeforest.com/?mode=8&id=6>

 

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog

The 2013 Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy will be held on Friday, June 7, and Saturday, June 8, 2013, in Toronto, Ontario, at the Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation and Fantasy, one of the world’s most important collections of fantastic literature.

We invite proposals for papers in any area of Canadian science fiction and fantasy, including:
-studies of individual works and authors;
-comparative studies;
-studies that place works in their literaryand/or cultural contexts.

Papers may be about works in any medium: literature, film, graphic novels and comic books, and so on. For studies of the audio-visual media, preference will be given to discussions of works produced in Canada or involving substantial Canadian creative contributions.

Papers should be no more than 20 minutes long, and geared toward a general as well as academic audience. Deadline: February 15, 2013. Please submit proposals (max. 500 words), to: Dr. Allan Weiss (aweiss[at]yorku[dot]ca).

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog
Monday, 26 November 2012 13:40

WorldCon 2013 (LoneStarCon 3) - CFP

LoneStarCon 3 (a.k.a.The 71st World Science Fiction Convention) will be held in San Antonio, Texas from August 29 September 2, 2013.

Guests of Honor: Ellen Datlow, James Gunn, Willie Siros, Norman Spinrad, Darrell K. Sweet, Leslie Fish, and Joe R. Lansdale

The academic track of the 2013 WorldCon is soliciting papers on all topics related to the science fiction and fantasy genres. We especially encourage papers related to the work of the guests of honor (listed above). Work on Steampunk, Old West/frontier themes, and Spanish language sf is also appreciated. Science fiction has long benefitted from works of criticism and scholarship from those outside the academy, a tradition that GoH Dr. James Gunn helped encourage. Paper proposals from both academics and nonacademics (fans) are welcome.

Paper proposals must include a 300-500 word abstract and appropriate bibliography. Proposals are due by December 31 2012, and participants will be notified by February 1, 2013 if their paper is accepted. All participants must be members of the convention. They will deliver a 15 minute reading of their paper as part of a panel, followed by a Q&A. Attendees may present only one paper at WorldCon, so please, no multiple submissions. All submissions (and any questions) should be sent to the head of the academic track, Karen Burnham (academic[at]texas.lonestarcon3[dot]org)

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog
Monday, 09 July 2012 12:06

African Science Fiction - CFP

Paradoxa is seeking submissions of previously unpublished essays on subjects related to AFRICAN SCIENCE FICTION

In 2010, Pumzi, the first Kenyan sf movie, won the best short film award at the Cannes Independent Film Festival, and the South African co-production District 9 was nominated for multiple Oscars. In 2011, Nigerian-American Nnedi Okorafor became the first author of African extraction to win the World Fantasy Award, with Who Fears Death, and South African Lauren Beukes became the first person from Africa to win the Arthur C. Clarke Award, with Zoo City.

Recent journal issues (African Identities 7.2, Science Fiction Studies 102, Social Text 20.2), edited collections (Barr's Afro-Future Females) and monographs (Lavender's Race in American Science Fiction, Nama's Black Space and Super Black) have been devoted to afrofuturism, African-American sf and African Americans in sf. In addition, there have been numerous publications on the relationships among sf, imperialism, colonialism, postcolonialism, globalization and Empire (cf. Science Fiction Studies 118, Hoagland/Sarwal's Science Fiction, Imperialism and the Third World, Kerslake's Science Fiction and Empire, Langer?s Postcolonialism and Science Fiction, Raja/Ellis/ Nandi's The Postnational Fantasy, Rieder's Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction).

Yet sf from Africa, and the Africa(s) in sf, remain relatively unexplored. In order to address this lacuna, the "Africa SF" issue of Paradoxa is interested in essays that address:

1. Critical work on sf by Africans, including such novels as Mohammed Dib's Who Remembers the Sea (1962), Sony Labou Tansi's Life and a Half (1977), Kojo Laing's Woman of the Aeroplanes (1988), Major Gentl and the Achimota Wars (1992) and Big Bishop Roko and the Altar Gangsters (2006), Ng'g' wa Thiong'o's Wizard of the Crow (2006), Lauren Beukes' Moxyland (2008) and Zoo City (2010), and Ahmed Khaled Towfik's Utopia (2008), and such films as Sankofa (Gerima 1993), Les Saignantes (Bekolo 2005), Africa Paradis (Amoussou 2006), District 9 (Blomkamp 2009), Pumzi (Kahiu 2009), and Kajola (Akinmolayan 2010). Can such novels as Ousmane Sembene's The Last of the Empire (1981) and Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani's I Do Not Come to You By Chance (2009) be productively read as sf? Is there African sf produced in other media?

2. Critical work on Afrodiasporic authors, filmmakers, musicians and artists, especially as they address Africa, imperialism, colonialism, postcolonialism, globalization, Empire, and/or diaspora, such as Steven Barnes, Octavia Butler, Copperwire, Samuel R. Delany, Tananarive Due, Minister Faust, Andrea Hairston, Pauline Hopkins, Nalo Hopkinson, T. Shirby Hodge, Anthony Joseph, LaBelle, Nnedi Okorafor, Outkast, Parliament-Funkadelic, Charles Saunders, George S Schuyler, Nishi Shawl, Sun Ra, and John A. Williams.

3. Critical work on the representation of Africa in sf by non-African authors, such as JG Ballard, VF Calverton, George Alec Effinger, Jon Courtenay Grimwood, Theodor Hertzka, Julian Huxley, AM Lightner, Ian MacDonald, Mike Resnick, Mack Reynolds, Jules Verne, as well as in comics (e.g., Marvel's Black Panther, the British-authored Nigerian Powerman) and other media.

Prospective contributors may contact the guest editor with questions about a particular topic's appropriateness. Double-spaced submissions should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words in length, not including “Works Cited,” and prepared in accordance with MLA style. Please forward manuscripts as MS Word attachments. Within the email itself include name, affiliation, 250-word abstract, and any other relevant information. Submissions should be directed to Paradoxa's guest editor, Mark Bould at mark.bould[at]gmail.com by March 1, 2013. For more information about Paradoxa see www.paradoxa.com.

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog
Wednesday, 18 April 2012 12:25

World SF Cinema and Television - CFP

Another tempting CFP. Going to ICFA last month reminded me how much I enjoy critically viewing SF-film, particularly non-Anglophone/American SF film. I took a lot of (non-Anglophone) film courses during undergrad and seriously considered pursuing media/film studies in graduate school (instead of English Literature). The deadline isn't until the fall, so I have time to put together something worthwhile. CFP follows:

 

Science Fiction Film and Television (http://liverpool.metapress.com/content/121631/) is seeking articles for a special issue in on world sf cinema and television.

Although excluding the US from discussions of world cinema and television creates a problematic opposition(ality), we are seeking critical work on sf from other national/transnational, and especially non-Anglophone, contexts, both historical and contemporary.

We are particularly, but not exclusively, interested in work which introduces and/or offers fresh insights into specific national cinemas/televisions, or which reconceptualises sf by relativising US/First Cinema variants as culturally-specific approaches rather than generic norms, or which addresses the following:

·           globalisation

·           transnationalism

·           imperialism, neo-imperialism, post-imperialism

·           colonialism, decolonisation, neo-colonialism, post-colonialism

·           sf from the Third World/Developing World/Global South

·           indigenous, Fourth World and Fourth Cinema sf

·           the subaltern

·           nationhood, national identity, regional identity

·           race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality

·           global networks, informational black holes

·           borders, borderlands

·           homelands, migrations, diasporas

·           national, international or transnational contexts of production, distribution or consumption

·           specific production cycles

Submissions should be made via our website at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/lup-sfftv.

 

Any queries should be directed to the editors, Mark Bould (mark.bould[at]gmail.com) and Sherryl Vint (sherryl.vint[at]gmail.com).

 

The deadline for submission to this special issue is September 1 2013.

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog
Call for Papers
The 2013 Joint Eaton/SFRA Conference
Science Fiction Media
April 10-14, 2013
Riverside Marriott Hotel
Riverside, California
This conference—cosponsored by the Eaton Collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy (UC Riverside) and the Science Fiction Research Association—will examine science fiction in multiple media. The past several decades have witnessed an explosion in SF texts across the media landscape, from film and TV to comics and digital games. We are interested in papers that explore SF as a multimedia phenomenon, whether focusing on popular mass media, such as Hollywood blockbusters, or on niche and subcultural forms of expression, such as MUDs and vidding. We invite paper and panel proposals that focus on all forms of SF, including prose fiction, and that address (but are not limited to) the following topics:
  • Mainstream Hollywood vs. Global SF Cinema
  • SF Comics and Manga
  • SF Anime and Animation
  • SF on the Internet and the World Wide Web
  • Multimedia “dispersed” SF narratives
  • Fandom, Cosplay, Mashups, and Remixing
  • Broadcast and Cable SF Television
  • SF Videogames
  • World’s Fairs, Theme Parks, and other “Material” SF Media
  • Short-form SF film
  • Afrofuturism
  • SF and/in Music
  • SF Idiom and Imagery in Advertising
  • Webisodes and TV Games
  • SF Art and Illustration
The conference will also feature the fourth Science Fiction Studies Symposium on the topic of “SF Media(tions),” with speakers Mark Bould, Istvan Csicsery-Ronay, Jr., and Vivian Sobchack. Keynote speakers and special guests will be announced as they are confirmed; see the conference website at http://eatonconference.ucr.edu/ for periodic updates.
Conference sessions will be held at the newly remodeled and centrally located Riverside Marriott Hotel, with rooms at a reduced conference rate ($109). For more about the hotel, see their website at: http://www.marriott.com/hotels/ hotel-information/travel/ralmc-riverside-marriott.
A block of rooms will also be available at a discount ($139) at the historic Mission Inn Hotel and Spa two blocks from the Marriott: http://missioninn.com.
Rooms in both hotels are limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Abstracts of 500 words (for papers of 20-minutes in length) should be submitted by September 14, 2012. We also welcome panel proposals gathering three papers on a cohesive topic. Send electronic submissions to conference co-chair Melissa Conway at Melissa.Conway@ucr.edu with the subject heading: EATON/SFRA CONFERENCE PROPOSAL. Please include a brief bio with your abstract and indicate whether your presentation would require A/V. Participants will be informed by December 1 if their proposals have been accepted.

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog

The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts has a special issue coming up on "The Canadian Fantastic" that looks like a lot of nationally specific scholarly SF fun. Since I couldn't find the CFP on the 'net, here it is for your perusal:

Towards the end of “We Have Met the Alien (And It Is Us)” (1985), Judith Merril concludes “after months of immersion in Canadian futures, that there is something one just might call a Canadian consciousness, and that this unique sensibility of accepting-and-coping might just have something of value to offer to the uncertain future of a planet in perilous pain” (23).

Although Merril was speaking of Canadian science fiction, Canadian authors saturate the entire range of those fictions we broadly label the “fantastic”: R. Scott Bakker, Sylvie Bérard, A. M. Dellamonica, Charles de Lint, Cory Doctorow, Candas Jane Dorsey, William Gibson, Hiromi Goto, Phyllis Gotlieb, Nalo Hopkinson, Tanya Huff, Guy Gavriel Kay, Yves Meynard, Spider Robinson, Geoff Ryman, Robert J. Sawyer, Karl Schroeder, S. M. Stirling, Jean-Louis Trudel, Elisabeth Vonarburg, A. E. van Vogt, Robert Charles Wilson, to alphabetize only a few of our northern stars.

This Special Issue of JFA on “The Canadian Fantastic” invites participants to consider Merril’s “Canadian consciousness” in those diverse realms of the fantastic. To submit a proposal, please send a 300 word abstract by February 15, 2012 to both:

Christine Mains: cemains(at)shaw.ca
Graham J. Murphy: grahammurphy(at)trentu.ca

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog

CFP: Technology as Cure – Representations of Disability in Science Fiction

Call for Papers

Representations of Disability in Science Fiction (essay collection; abstracts due Nov. 18/11)

Contributions are invited for an essay collection on the representations of disability and the disabled body in science fiction. Technology is often characterized as a cure for the disabled body – one that either elides or exacerbates corporeal difference. From block buster films and televised space operas to cyberpunk and hard SF, disabled bodies are often modified and supported by technological interventions. How are dis/ability, medical “breakthroughs,” (bio) technologies, and the body theorized, materialized, and politicized in science fiction? This collection is particularly interested in the ways dis/abled bodies challenge normative discourses of ability, generate novel spaces of embodiment, and proliferate new understandings of human being.

Contributions are welcomed from both academic- and arts-based researchers and practitioners from a wide range of critical perspectives: literary studies, disability studies, feminist studies, science and technology studies, critical theory, race studies, queer studies, media studies, film studies, Aboriginal studies, cultural studies, and rhetoric studies. Papers may deal with the representation of disability in any form of popular genre SF: film, television, and print (including all SF subgenres i.e.: feminist SF, post-cyberpunk, hard SF, steampunk, etc.). All possible topics related to the representation of disability and disabled persons in SF are welcome: dis/ability, illness, technology as cure, prosthesis, diseased bodies/contagion, care of the self, alterations to the body, corporeal boundaries, environmental modifications, medical care, and alternative constructions of being.

Send a 300- to 500-word abstract, working title, and a brief bio, by email in a Word attachment, to kathryn@academiceditingcanada.ca before or on November 18, 2011. Inquiries are also welcome. Final papers should range in length from 5000-8000 words and will be due late March 2012 (a set date will be sent out along with acceptance notifications).

About the editor: Kathryn Allan received her PhD in English Literature from McMaster University (2010) studying feminist post-cyberpunk SF and theories of the vulnerable body. She currently is an independent SF scholar, working as a freelance writer and (academic) editor.

Published in Kathryn Allan's Blog
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